Home
Fantasy
SciFi
         Books
         Movies
         Television
         Dune
Writings
Literature
Movies
Links


Message Forum
Site Map
Contact Us



PatriotResource.com:
Main Index
Film Index
Film: Gladiator
Film: National Treasure
Film: The Patriot
Film: Tombstone
Films: General
Films: Fantasy
Films: SciFi
History: 1775-1781
History: September 11th
Lord of the Rings
OtherWorld: Index
TV Series: Index
TV: Battlestar Galactica
TV: Caprica
TV: Deadliest Catch
TV: Lost
TV Series: Action
TV Series: Animated
TV: BBC Presentations
TV Series: Comedy
TV Series: Drama
TV: Fantasy/SciFi
TV Series: Western
TV Series: Reviews
WCA Alumni

Orson Scott Card

Ender's Game   Speaker for the Dead

Ender's Game was a page turner and had a great plot twist at the end that is perfect for a movie (maybe one day, it will finally be made into a movie) if they don't mess up the rest of the book. We follow Ender, a rare "third" (child) who is drafted into military school at age ten and is forced to grow up quicker than most children, even the other children at the school with him. The reason why he is under the additional pressure is part of the story twist at the end. The story is disturbing, but as William Golding's Lord of the Flies also showed, children are capable acting like grown-up and as such they can be more forgiving, but also more viscious, since they still only see in black and white.

Speaker for the Dead follows Ender and his family again and revolves in part around the results of the events of Ender's Game, but is much more cerebral and less action driven. It is barely a sequel and by no means the second book in a series. I wasn't expecting the completely different approach that Card takes in the second book, but once I stopped trying to read the book as a second Ender's Game, I enjoyed it just as thoroughly for its own style.

Ender's Game was mostly about Ender and his relationships with the other children. It was much more personal in focus until near the end. Speaker for the Dead was more about humanity as a whole and its relationships and philosophies between societies and is in a way more "grown up." That may make more sense when you read both books for yourself, which I recommend you do.


Absolut Paradigm

           OtherWorld Science Fiction Books: Ray BradburyOtherWorld: Science Fiction Books IndexOtherWorld Science Fiction Books: Arthur C. Clarke

Copyright © 1999-2014; Scott Cummings, All Rights Reserved. Privacy Statement.